Food Trucks, the Sequel!

Brand-new L’es-Car-Go; photography by Shannon O’Hara

Food Trucks, the Sequel!

by Dotty Griffith | Houston magazine | May 29, 2012

Even art critics are now taking H-Town food trucks seriously. The MFA and the Smithsonian, no less! This gourmet-grub trend is definitely shifting into overdrive.

Makeup Made Over

Tonya Riner; photography by Julie Soefer

Makeup Made Over

by Holly Crawford | Houston magazine | May 29, 2012

A delicate blonde with creamy skin and clear green eyes, makeup artist Tonya Riner, 40, appears to be the poster child for barefaced beauty. But the emerging cosmetics biz titan actually wears several products. In fact, she deftly dabs, blends and glosses up with Beauty for Real, a color collection she created with her biz partner and dear friend, Miami-based makeup artist Leslie Munsell, 52.

Famished: The Best Things I've Eaten This Week

Food editor Sara Deseran on what's eating SF.   Read More »

Surfing NYC

Jeff McCallum’s MFord board ($1,050) at Saturdays Surf NYC

Surfing NYC

by Laura Neilson | Manhattan magazine | May 25, 2012

It’s time to grab a longboard and hit the LIE! But surf culture is alive and swell in Manhattan, too. This month Saturdays Surf NYC opens a West Village location (17 Perry St.), offering Bing surfboards, the retailer’s men’s collection, photo books and an espresso bar.

Foul Play

Kristine Subido with her Filipino-style marinated chicken. Photography by Neil Burger

Foul Play

by Lisa Shames | CS magazine | May 25, 2012

You might assume Pecking Order, the new Uptown restaurant from former Wave Executive Chef Kristine Subido, got its name solely from its featured menu item: roasted, grilled and fried chicken marinated overnight in a garlicky Filipino sauce. But the moniker has just as much to do with Subido’s partnership with her mom, Melinda, who provides the marinade recipe and the counter-service spot’s desserts, as it does the poultry-centric plates. “This is something my mom and I have been talking about for the past five years,” says Subido.

In Harmony

Atlanta’s William Boling and his new Fall Line Press; photography by Jamie Hopper

In Harmony

by Candice Dyer | The Atlantan magazine | May 25, 2012

William Boling became intrigued by Georgia’s “fall line”—a geological term for the tectonic drop in elevation winding through the state—when he observed the changes in plants, waterfalls and other features that surrounded it.

“It seemed like a natural metaphor for the coming together of different things, of what two different spaces can offer each other,” he says.

Finishing Touches

Illustration by Donovan Foote

Finishing Touches

by Stephanie Davis Smith | The Atlantan magazine | May 25, 2012

Sadly, no amount of exercise or eating right can cure cellulite. But new technology battles the bulge in unique ways. The city’s top dimple docs reveal three secret weapons for gorgeous gams.

On the Huntz

Designer Megan Huntz in her studio, wearing one of her own creations; photo by Scott Asano

On the Huntz

by Emily L. Foley | The Atlantan magazine | May 25, 2012

Haute couture is a fashion extravagance typically reserved for the 1 percent, but fashion designer and Atlanta-native Megan Huntz is bringing the luxury of handcrafted designs straight to the everyman—well, woman.

Talking Bull

Mickey Gilley and John Travolta on the set of 1980’s Houston-filmed "Urban Cowboy"

Talking Bull

by Jeff Gremillion | Houston magazine | May 25, 2012

Many locals know that Gilley’s in Pasadena—the largest honky-tonk in the world, per Guinness—burned to the ground in 1990 after spawning the Urban Cowboy craze of the ’80s, the phenomenon that in turn spawned the Reagan era’s epic country-music explosion. What they might not know is that the club’s co-proprietor, Mickey Gilley, himself a country star with 17 No. 1 hits, is cousins with two other piano-playing icons—rock legend Jerry Lee Lewis and infamous televangelist Jimmy Swaggart.

Next Stop: DC

The Hamilton is just one new venue bringing more bands to DC; photo by Maddie Meyer

Next Stop: DC

by Lauren Sloat | DC magazine | May 25, 2012

Don’t be deceived by J.Crew setting up shop this summer in Washington’s favorite icon of its ’80s music scene—the 9:30 Club’s original venue. The retail takeover is hardly signalling the end of an era. DC’s draw for artists and audiences is only getting bigger and better. In fact, serendipity, history and technology have conspired to make this a great year for live music in the district.

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