Now Playing



Ex-Reddit Employee Talks Smack About Reddit on Reddit

Surprise: It didn't end well.

 

We'd hate to be working for Reddit's HR department right about now. Just days after the company raised hackles by requiring its staff to move to California, a former employee took to the site to criticize his (unrelated) firing—and was promptly smacked down by none other than the company's CEO. Pretty brutally, too.

In a post, a user under the name dehrmann claimed that he had been terminated for questioning the web site's charitable contributions. "Two weeks earlier, I raised concerns about donating 10% of ad revenue to charity," he wrote. "Some management likes getting feedback, some doesn't. The reason I had concerns was that this was revenue, not income. That means you need ~10% margins to break even. This can be hard to do; Yahoo and Twitter don't. Salesforce does something similar, but it's more all-around, and in a way that promotes the product without risking the company's financials."

So far so good. Until Reddit CEO Yishan Wong showed up, that is. Clearly annoyed, Wong posted a lengthy reply, in which he wrote, "You were fired for the following reasons: 1. Incompetence and not getting much work done. 2. Inappropriate or irrelevant comments/questions when interviewing candidates. 3. Making incorrect comments in public about reddit's systems that you had very little knowledge of, even after having these errors pointed out by your peers and manager. 4. Not taking feedback from your manager or other engineers about any of these when given to you, continuing to do #2 until we removed you from interviewing, and never improving at #1."

Yikes. No word yet as to if either man would prefer to fight 100 duck-sized horses or one horse-sized duck.

 

Have feedback? Email us at letterssf@sanfranmag
Email Scott Lucas at slucas@modernluxury.com
Follow us on Twitter @sanfranmag
Follow Scott Lucas on Twitter @ScottLucas86